Final Exam Prep

As I’ve said ALL YEAR, use all of your old quizzes and tests as a study guide for the final exam.

You can also scroll through this website through old posts to access information about the main sections we covered this semester:

September Posts

  • Puritans (Jonathan Edwards – “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”)
  • Rationalists (Ben Franklin from Autobiography and from Poor Richard’s Almanac)
  • Introduction to Romantics & Transcendentalists:
    • Emerson: from Nature & from Self-Reliance
    • Thoreau: from Walden
  • Introduction to Dark Romantics
    • Irving: “Devil & Tom Walker”

October Posts

  • Civil Disobedience
    • Thoreau
    • King
    • Ghandi
  • Conformity
    • Thoreau
    • Emerson
    • Podcasts: Becoming Batman & Entanglement
  • Last of the Mohicans
  • Dark Romanticism: Poe
    • “Tell-Tale Heart”
    • “The Black Cat”
    • “The Pit & The Pendulum”

November Posts

  • More Poe
  • Dark Romantic Stories

December Posts

  • Poetry Terms
  • Whitman
    • Song of Myself verse 52 (which you have as a handout & we have already discussed)
    • “I Hear America Singing”
    • Song of Myself verse 10
    • “A Sight in Camp in the Daybreak Gray and Dim”
  • Dickinson
    • “Because I could not stop for Death”
    • “I Heard a Fly Buzz — when I died”
    • “Tell all the Truth but tell it slant”
  • Dead Poets Society

 

Dickinson’s Poetry

Add the following definitions to the list of poetry terms you started with Whitman (from previous post):

Exact Rhyme: When two or more words have an identical sound: bee / free or fixture / mixture

Slant Rhyme:  When two or more words have a close but NOT EXACT rhyme sound: society / majority or nerve / love

Paradox: Statement that seems to be contradictory (usually has embedded irony & alludes to the tone of the poem): “parting is such sweet sorrow”

We discussed these terms and analyzed the following poems in your text:

  • “Because I could not stop for Death”
  • “I Heard a Fly Buzz — when I died”
  • “Tell all the Truth but tell it slant”

Whitman’s Poetry

Students took notes on the following terms & we discussed the following poems below (which will be on your final exam).

  • Song of Myself verse 52 (which you have as a handout & we have already discussed)
  • “I Hear America Singing”
  • Song of Myself verse 10
  • “A Sight in Camp in the Daybreak Gray and Dim”

Poetry Terms:

Free Verse: Poetry written without regular rhyme schemes & meter; still uses other elements of poetry though

Alliteration: Repetition of similar consonant sounds

Assonance: Repetition of similar vowel sounds

Imagery: Use of language to evoke pictures as well as sensations like smell, taste, hearing, touch (Sensory Language)

Onomatopoeia: words whose sounds echo their meaning

Parallel Structure: Repetition of phrases, clauses, or sentences that have the same grammatical structure

Cadence Musical run of words; rises & fall of words & sounds in a poem

Catalogue: Long lists of related things, people, ore events, creates a rhythm & repetition in Whitman’s poems

Coda: Summing up & restatement of themes of poems

Tone: Attitude the writer takes toward a subject

Whitman & Dickinson

We read and analyzed one Dickinson and Whitman poem on Monday 11/30 & Tuesday 12/01.  We even went outside to send our “barbaric yawp” over the rooftop of Lincoln. Overall, the demonstration was pathetic; many of you need to find your YAWP!

Read the following sections in your text about Walt Whitman.  Make an outline of notes focusing on the major points from the readings in your text and the excerpts in this Whitman Handout. Notes are due Wednesday 12/03.  Late notes will be accepted for ½ credit on Thursday 12/04. Quiz over Whitman & Dickinson on Friday 12/05. Make-up quizzes on Monday 12/07 will be short answer / essay.

  • 302-305 (Whitman & Dickinson Intro)
  • 307-309 (Whitman)
  • 321 Background 
  • 323-324 (Whitman’s private writings)

Read the following sections in your text about Emily Dickinson. Make an outline of notes focusing on the major points from the readings in your text and the excerpts in this Dickinson Handout. Notes over Dickinson are due Thursday 12/04. Late notes will be accepted for ½ credit on Friday 12/05. Quiz over Whitman & Dickinson on Friday 12/05. Make-up quizzes on Monday 12/07 will be short answer / essay.

  • 335-336 (Dickinson)
  • 350 Make the Connection
  • 351 (Dickinson letter)